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Golden Age of Television, Volumes 1-5

Category: Drama
Duration: 10 hours
Media: DVD
Catalog Number: 91643
Was: $39.9    Now: $33.92


Description
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In the mid-1950s, the dramatic anthology series was one of the most popular TV formats. The 12 powerful dramas included in this 5-DVD boxed set feature performances by Charlton Heston, Anne Bancroft, John Forsythe, Eddie Albert, Berry Kroeger, Victor Jory, Walter Slezak, Roland Young, and more!

Episodes Include:

I Am Not Alone: Shortly after WWII, a Polish nationalist is subjected to brutal psychological torture in a Soviet prison. Starring Victor Jory.

Man With A Beard: A man refuses to shave his new beard, inciting his clean-shaven neighbors into a xenophobic frenzy, resulting in violent and tragic consequences.

Recipe For Success: Master chef Henri Charpentier, the inventor of Crepes Suzette, reminisces with famed actress Sarah Bernhardt about his career feeding the world's rich and famous. In his 70s, his business and fortune are wiped out by unfair government regulations, yet he scrapes himself together and determines to bounce back. Starring Walter Slezak.

The Mountain That Moved: A landslide buries a tunnel that carries water through a mountain to the valley's farms. Heroic blasting crews work around the clock for months, racing to cut a new channel in record time, before the struggling farmers lose everything they own.

Mr. Mummery's Suspicion: A fiendish female cook has been poisoning her patrons, and highly suggestible Mr. Mummery suspects that his young wife may have just hired the culinary killer. An opened canister of arsenic in the garden shed confirms his darkest fears that, indeed, his tea has been tampered with. But the truth of things is even more dire than he imagines. Starring Roland Young, Faith Brook, Francis Compton; Directed by Martin Magner.

Away From It All: A navy pilot ditches his plane in the ocean near a remote Pacific island where he and his female crew-mate discover a lavishly furnished estate peopled by a handful of jaded society drop-outs. The leader of the exiles declares his intention to keep the newcomers captive, but the young flier is equally determined to get back to civilization. Starring Kevin McCarthy, Catherine McLeod, Richard Purdy; Directed by John Peyser

None but My Foe: The price of paranoia is evident in a small American town during WWII, when unscrupulous bureaucrats mistakenly jail an innocent woman for treason, indirectly leading to a second woman's death. The enraged brother of the deceased, determined to teach everyone a lesson, stages an ill-conceived stunt involving the town's drinking water supply. The ensuing madness, rumor and panic lead to more false arrests, mob riots and vigilante violence. Starring John Forsythe, Howard Freeman, June Dayton; Adapted and produced by Worthington Miner.

The Trial of John Peter Zenger: In 1735, German born printer John Peter Zenger was unjustly imprisoned and put on trial for sedition and libel after publishing criticism of the New York colony's corrupt Governor William Cosby. In a rigged court, fighting against formidable odds, Zenger was ultimately acquitted. Fifty years later, this verdict would serve as the basis of the First Amendment - Freedom of the Press. Starring Eddie Albert, Marian Seldes, Frederick Worlock; Directed by Paul Nickell.

Luigi Pirandello's Henry IV (1949, B&W): A fall from a horse leaves a wealthy man with a head injury and a persistent delusion that he is 11th century Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV of Germany. After 20 years of enabling and reinforcing his dementia, his psychiatrist summons the man's ex-wife to participate in a costumed charade meant to provide a possible cure. But the patient harbors long-festering dark motivations of his own, and he twists the proceedings to his own vengeful ends. This Westinghouse Studio One production is based on often-staged 1922 masterwork by Luigi Pirandello, Enrico IV. Starring Berry Kroeger, Richard Purdy, Catherine Williard and Virginia McMahon; Directed by Paul Nickell.

The Story of Meg Mallory (1952, B&W): The Mayor's pretty young daughter is kidnapped and held for ransom. While in captivity, she falls in love with her captor, Carl. Once returned to her family, Meg is pressured to go against her heart and testify against Carl, despite her conviction that he is not the real villain. Starring Thomas Mitchell, Wendy Drew and Skip Homeier; Directed by Paul Nickell.

Willow Cabin (1950, B&W): Screen legend Charlton Heston stars as Michael Knowle, a wealthy British surgeon whose extramarital affair with rising young stage actress Caroline Seward sets tongues wagging across pre-war London. When Caroline abandons her skyrocketing career to be with him, Michael is torn and his inner torments rise to the surface. With his wife Mercedes traveling though France, Michael's plans for divorce are constantly interrupted and delayed. After war breaks out and Mercedes is captured by the Nazis, Caroline watches helplessly as Michael enters a deadly tailspin of depression and drink. The Willow Cabin was produced live on network TV on February 27, 1950 and was one of 12 dramas Charlton Heston starred in for Westinghouse Studio One.

Wintertime (1951, B&W): In 1946, post-war Germans live in bleak desperation, pinched between American occupiers, Soviet spies and corrupt police. In bombed-out Nordune, ex-prisoner of war Martin Helm returns home after four years to find a city of starving survivors - including a terrified young Latvian refugee named Lisa. After being tortured in Nazi concentration camps, Lisa is now on the run from the Russians who are hunting for her brother, a nationalist guerilla fighter. Thrown together by the cruel chaos of war, the two find love amid the rubble. But the budding new life they dream of is threatened when Martin kills a communist agent and Lisa is imprisoned. This gripping and suspenseful post-war thriller was aired live on April 2, 1951 and benefits from powerful acting by its stellar cast. A young Anne Bancroft (billed as Anne Marno) gives a commanding performance as the troubled refugee and receives outstanding support from British actor Patric Knowles (How Green Was My Valley, The Wolf Man) and German actress Leni Stengel. Character actor Kurt Katch is equally memorable as the sadistic police boss who brutally interrogates Lisa after her arrest.


 

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